South Collingham.
South Collingham.

South Collingham (St. John Baptist). A two-light Decorated window, usual position in south wall of chancel, cill brought down 14in. lower than adjoining cill, and lower portion of lights separated by a transom. Judging by the section of the transom, I should say that the lower openings were once fitted with a shutter, but it is impossible now to determine, as the jambs and mullion have been renewed, and leaded glazing fixed. Each light is 14in. wide, 2ft. Sin. high; height from floor to glass line 3ft. 8½in.

Normanton-on-Soar (dedication variously given as St. John, St. James, and St. Mary). A large cruciform Early English church, without aisles. A two-light Decorated window in usual position in south wall of chancel, only 3in. from chancel arch; the lower portion separated by a transom leaving two openings, each 19in. wide, 22in. high, 3½ft. from floor to cill, 6ft. from ground to cill. The openings are now glazed, but the rebates indicate shutters. Plain chamfer outside, square reveals inside, flat cill. Priest's door on north side still in use, and a blocked-up doorway on south side close to the "low side window." A large three-light Perpendicular window has been inserted in the south wall beyond the transept. This now gives light on the pulpit which stands in the south-eastern corner of the nave (see p. 103).

Stanford-on-Soar.
Stanford-on-Soar.

Barnby-in-the-Willows.
Barnby-in-the-Willows.

Stanford-on-Soar (St. John Baptist). Chancel rebuilt 1894, a fragment of the old wall at west end on south side, containing a two-light Decorated window, was left intact and incorporated with new work. Beneath the cill of this window there is an aperture 21in. wide, 24in. high, 28in. from floor to cill, 34in. from ground to cill. Moulded jambs outside to correspond with window above and wide equal splays inside. The opening is blocked with a slab of stone, but a rebate for shutter, iron hooks for hinges, and a slot for a bolt are to be seen. The hooks are on the eastern jamb. It would not be possible to see the altar through this opening. Village lies north and east.

Barnby-in-the-Willows (All Saints). The details of this church (Decorated period) are remarkable. A bold string moulding runs round the chancel, inside and outside, at a height of about 8ft. from the floor. On this string the window cills are set, and beneath it, on either side, and opposite to each other, are doorways. The two-light windows between these doors and the west end of the chancel are brought down through the string moulding to within 4ft. of the floor. They are glazed, and appear at first sight to be part of the windows, but it should be noticed that while the jambs of the lower portion consist of a hollow and a chamfer, the upper portion has, in addition, a quarter-round member, and this is stopped on the outside, at the string moulding which here becomes a transom, with a carved head. Although I cannot find any trace of hooks or bolt, I am of opinion that these lower openings were originally fitted with shutters.

Halam (St. Michael). On the north side of chancel— a vestry is built on the south side—are two square-headed Decorated windows; between the western one and the aisle, a rectangular opening surrounded by a plain chamfer, 24in. wide, 4ft. 4in. high, 3ft. 3in. from ground to cill, built up with masonry, no trace to be seen within. A peculiarity of this church is that it is not truly orientated—the angles and not the faces of the square Norman tower face the cardinal points. A bell in the tower, 14½in. by 18in. diam. across the mouth, is said to be the sanctus bell of Norman or Plantagenet days.

Haughton Chapel. A small church, ruined and deserted, embosomed in trees on the right bank of the Maun. Nave and north aisle. Chancel with chapel on north side. Bellcote at west end. Norman door on south side. The south wall of chancel contains a two-light Decorated window at east end, and a blocked-up rectangular opening 18in. from west end, 13in. wide, 24in. high, 20in. from ground to cill. There are no houses or roads within about a mile of the site.

Nuthall.
Nuthall.

Nuthall (St. Patrick). In the south wall of the chancel, 16½in. from west end, a rectangular opening 9in. wide, with 2in. chamfer all round, 24in. high, 24in. from ground to cill, built up with rubble masonry and plastered over inside. The north wall was removed to make way for vestry. Hagioscope in north pier of chancel arch. Village lies to north and east; main road parallel with south wall. The two - light Decorated window above the aperture is a good example of the square-headed Decorated windows prevalent in the county, and contains fragments of ancient armorial glass.

Burton Joyce (St. Helen). A two-light Decorated window at west end of south wall of chancel, having a simple chamfer on external jamb. Cill brought down 2½ft. lower than window at east end of wall, which is set in a double reveal. The lower portion of each light is blocked with stone, 16in. by 16in., removing all trace of rebates or hinges. Height from ground to cill, 3ft. 7in. The chancel, which was rebuilt on the old foundations circa 1349 by the canons of Shelford, to whom the living had been conveyed by Archbishop Zouch, of York, was again rebuilt in 1879, the old materials being re-used. A water-butt, with shed roof over, has been fixed in the angle, making it impossible to obtain a good photograph. The tracery is identical with the window at Nuthall. A small lancet in centre of north aisle, 14in. wide, 2ft. 4in. high, 3ft. 9in. from floor to cill, was probably intended to light the mass priest in the large chantry, which dominated this church. It is quite impossible to see an altar or any important feature through the opening.

Low Marnham (St. Wilfrid). A similar arrangement to the last, of the south chancel wall, save that the western window has a transom, and the openings are now glazed.

Laxton.
Laxton.

Laxton (St. Michael). There is a "low side window" at the east end of the south wall of chancel. The reason for this unusual position is obvious. When the chancel was rebuilt (circa 1400) an aisle was thrown out on either side to form sepulchral chapels for the lords of Laxton. The south side was for the Everinghams—superior lords, the north side for the Lexingtons. The chapels are separated from the chancel by an arcade of three bays, with clerestory above, extending to within 7½ft. of the east end. The upper part of this wall space is pierced on either side by a tall graceful two-light Decorated window having transoms and tracery heads of different design. Beneath the string moulding on the south side there is a small opening, 3½in. wide, 18in. high, with moulded jambs outside; wide splays and shutter rebates inside. This is the only "low side window" in the county through which a view of the altar may possibly be obtained, but the height above ground outside, 5½ft. to top of cill, and the height in relation to the altar inside, indicate that this was not the intention. An examination of the plan of the church (Vol. VI. Thoroton Transactions, 1902) will shew that this is the only place available for the shuttered opening, if the sacring bell theory is accepted.

Special Cases.

Mansfield.
Mansfield.

Mansfield (SS. Peter and Paul). In the south wall of chancel there is a small opening 4½ft. from the floor, with splays on outer face. This squint is not now external, for a chantry chapel has been built as an aisle on the south side of the chancel. I am of opinion that the squint was cut through the wall to communicate between the two altars when this chantry was built in the 15th century.

Linby (St. Michael). On the east side of doorway in north porch a cusped opening, 3in. wide, 12¾in. high, 3ft. 8in. from ground to top of cill. The internal opening is 8½in. wide, 15½in. high. The opening is formed obliquely through the wall and inclines towards the east. Inside the church was a squint, between the chantry chapel at east end of south aisle and altar in chancel.

Class B.

Car Colston (St. Mary). One of a series of fine Decorated chancels built by the York school of masons circa 1360. A small two-light window, each light 7½in. wide, 36in. high to springing, 6½ft. from ground to cill, at west end of chancel wall on south side, with internal quadrant splay to west, deeply splayed cill and horizontal soffit. A comparison between this window and the work at Arnold (built thirty years previously by the same school) is very striking, and has led me to the conclusion that this window was intended to light the approach to the rood-loft. At Arnold there is evidence that the rood-loft was on the west side of the chancel arch. The circular staircase by which it was approached is still intact. This is well lighted by the slit in the angle. (See sketch.)

East Bridgford.
East Bridgford.

Lowdham.
Lowdham.


Upton.

East Bridgford (St. John Baptist, or St. Mary, or St. Peter). On the south side of the chancel, between the priest's door and west end of wall, a small single-light window, with cuspings, 18in. wide, 3ft. 6in. high to springing of arch, 3ft. 3in. from floor to top of cill, 3ft. 11in. from ground to cill. On the internal splays a ledge was formed for a book rest on the eastern jamb, and for a seat on the western jamb. This window was inserted about forty years ago in place of an older one, but whether it follows the old lines cannot now be determined.

Lowdham (St. Mary). The same sizes and description apply here, save that the window head is made out of one large stone instead of a built-up arch. This portion of the wall is original work, having been left intact when the chancel was rebuilt and incorporated in the new work.

Upton (St. Peter). The chancel is lighted on the south side by two square-headed Decorated windows, and in addition there is a small lancet two feet from the west end, 12in. wide, 2ft. 3½in. to apex of arch, 2ft. 4½in. from ground to cill. This chancel was rebuilt in 1863, the old stone dressings were re-worked, and the window is said to be in its original position. The internal splays are equal. No indication of a shutter. There is an aisle, and a chantry on the north side, with a hagioscope through the pier of the chancel arch, giving a direct view to the altar. At the west end of the north aisle a lancet has been introduced, 11 in. wide, 2ft. 6in. high to springing, 7ft. 6in. from floor to cill, with wide internal splays. This window is older than the walling, and was probably built in when the aisle was added, to light a gallery across the west end.